+ Reply to Thread
Page 4 of 5 FirstFirst ... 2 3 4 5 LastLast
Results 76 to 100 of 114

Thread: The Fission legacy

  1. #76
    Banned ELSpeedo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    racing death
    Ride
    Deaths Chariot
    Posts
    9,352

    Default Re: More nuclear weapons.

    Quote Originally Posted by Lyonsy View Post
    lol yeah got it to work now
    still rather smog till they have cold fussion,
    although i like how they are doing storage of the waste buy making the waste into glass so it cant contaminate the soil or water tables

    Fusion will beat dirty Fusion in twenty years.
    After these disasters you'd think they'd be
    in the race for the first fusion reactor in the world
    as the US, Russia, France and others are chasing...
    Fusion does not go critical either. There is no
    reason why Australia should not have fusion
    reactors. No big water demands either...

    Quote-
    As of July 2010[update], the largest experiment by means of Magnetic confinement fusion has been the Joint European Torus (JET). In 1997, JET produced a peak of 16.1 megawatts (21,600 hp) of fusion power (65% of input power), with fusion power of over 10 MW (13,000 hp) sustained for over 0.5 sec. In June 2005, the construction of a new experimental reactor, ITER, was announced by the seven parties involved in the project. These include the U.S., China, the European Union (EU), India, Japan, the Russian Federation, and South Korea.[1] ITER is designed to produce ten times more fusion power than the power put into the plasma over many minutes; for example 50 MW of input power to produce 500 MW of output power. ITER is currently under construction in Cadarache, France. Additionally, the US National Ignition Facility as well as the planned European Union High Power laser Energy Research facility (HiPER) are promising experimental sites in generating power by the different method of Inertial confinement fusion.

    The first fusion reactor to generate electrical power is planned for DEMO, the next-generation facility to follow ITER. It has been proposed to begin construction in 2024.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fusion_power

    Last edited by ELSpeedo; 21-03-2011 at 09:10 PM.

  2. #77
    Lion Eyes. Redwight's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Tolga, QLD.
    Age
    49
    Ride
    BA Falcon ute, AU XR
    Posts
    5,814

    Default Re: More nuclear weapons.

    Don't get me wrong either way, when fusion is a workable product we should all do a big double take. Fission has a history of issues that none of us really support, Chernobyl being one of the worst but for the time being the Japanese incident is small in comparison. They have worked their backsides off to get all of the aspects covered including keeping their own staff healthy where the Russians had no choice but to kill many helicopter pilots concreting the radiation into a tomb that they still cannot go anywhere near. I'll dig up a site dedicated to the process and aftermath of Chernobyl when I can think to, it's a real eye opener on how not to do stuff.

    My problem is that over inciting fear is one of the worst things any responsible person can do, this has been a major issue but the reactors held up to a much bigger earthquake than the original design called for and the subsequent damage is actually not as bad as some of the press are making it look. If there is to be another incident I would hope that the companies and countries involved have taken something from the previous problems that mean they are more in control next time.

  3. #78
    Banned ELSpeedo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    racing death
    Ride
    Deaths Chariot
    Posts
    9,352

    Default Re: More nuclear weapons.

    Quote Originally Posted by Redwight View Post
    Don't get me wrong either way, when fusion is a workable product we should all do a big double take. Fission has a history of issues that none of us really support, Chernobyl being one of the worst but for the time being the Japanese incident is small in comparison. They have worked their backsides off to get all of the aspects covered including keeping their own staff healthy where the Russians had no choice but to kill many helicopter pilots concreting the radiation into a tomb that they still cannot go anywhere near. I'll dig up a site dedicated to the process and aftermath of Chernobyl when I can think to, it's a real eye opener on how not to do stuff.

    My problem is that over inciting fear is one of the worst things any responsible person can do, this has been a major issue but the reactors held up to a much bigger earthquake than the original design called for and the subsequent damage is actually not as bad as some of the press are making it look. If there is to be another incident I would hope that the companies and countries involved have taken something from the previous problems that mean they are more in control next time.

    It ain't over yet. Im afraid its just begun.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2011/03/24/wo...apan.html?_r=1
    Its now in the water supply. Mothers with infants are advised to avoid. So if your thyroid has problems
    you may also have more problems or have a compromised central immune system.

    If it got into the water supply this is something that needs to be fixed as cancer cases over the next 10
    years could be very large indeed.

    Quote-
    Ei Yoshida, head of water purification for the Tokyo water department, said at a televised news conference that iodine 131 had been detected in water samples at a level of 210 becquerels per liter, about a quart. The recommended limit for infants is 100 becquerels per liter. For adults, the recommended limit is 300 becquerels. (The unit is named for Henri Becquerel, one of the discoverers of radioactivity.)

    There was some confusion about the public health advice, with experts saying it should also apply to pregnant women, since they and fetuses were vulnerable.

    “It’s unfortunate, but the radiation is clearly being carried on the air from the ***ushima plant,” Yukio Edano, the chief cabinet secretary, said Wednesday. “Because it’s raining, it’s possible that a lot of places will be affected. Even if people consume the water a few times, there should be no long-term ill effects.

    noting that the prevailing breezes seemed to be pushing radiation out to sea.

    So maybe Hawaii may be affected also. Gives a new term 'garbage for the neighbors'.

    As the radiation leeches more into the water table I expect it may increase. Not to mention
    all the fallout contaminating food over a large area.

    http://www.independent.co.uk/news/wo...t-2250144.html
    The secrecy regarding the accident and the lies peddled so far make Japans Atomic Energy agency and their Govt look near as good as Communist Russia telling the Ukrainians 'it will be ok'.

    Quote-
    The government has also begun studying contamination of fish food after discovering radioactive materials 128 times higher than the legal limit in the seas around the plant.It was reported yesterday that minuscule amounts of radioactive particles believed to have come from the ***ushima power plant had been detected as far away as Iceland.

    If it can reach Iceland it can reach Australia. Stocking up on iodine...After all in Finland/Sweden & Norway after Chernobyl deer meat was banned due to high radiation levels.

    http://www.pharmacist.com/AM/Templat...ontentID=25706
    Quote-
    Patients in the United States may have heard that they need to stock up on potassium iodide to protect themselves.There is now a shortage of potassium iodide because of the demand for it as a precautionary measure. Pharmacists should advise against U.S. patients taking or stockpiling potassium iodide so that it can be used more appropriately for those in need. There is no need for U.S. citizens to take or stock up on potassium iodide because of the reactor crisis in Japan.

    In the unlikely event that potassium iodide is needed, advise patients to follow NRC and area public health agency guidance on the use of potassium iodide, as its utility is determined by the timing of the dosage following exposure to radioactive I-131.
    Last edited by ELSpeedo; 26-03-2011 at 03:22 PM.

  4. #79
    Lion Eyes. Redwight's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Tolga, QLD.
    Age
    49
    Ride
    BA Falcon ute, AU XR
    Posts
    5,814

    Default Re: More nuclear weapons.

    Yes and thyroid cancer is highly treatable, and rarely fatal. It is an undesired situation that hasn't gone supernova yet, I am more worried to hear that one reactor may actually be heavily damaged and will most likely need special attention to get the remaining problems under control properly. Dismantling a busted reactor isn't for the faint of heart.



  5. #80
    Banned ELSpeedo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    racing death
    Ride
    Deaths Chariot
    Posts
    9,352

    Default Re: More nuclear weapons.

    Quote Originally Posted by Redwight View Post
    Yes and thyroid cancer is highly treatable, and rarely fatal. It is an undesired situation that hasn't gone supernova yet, I am more worried to hear that one reactor may actually be heavily damaged and will most likely need special attention to get the remaining problems under control properly. Dismantling a busted reactor isn't for the faint of heart.
    Depending on your dose Redright. Two technicians at the reactor treaded into
    highly radiactive water. They are hospitalised. They were not wearing protective
    equipment. They have lost control of the reactors. Their PM is ****ting himself as
    whats going to happen next. If all 3 blow it will be much worse than Chenoybyl.
    The Japanese Govt and coverups is Well known from Minimata when one particular
    company decided to dump mercury in the water supply which made it into a known
    fishing area. The results for the people was deadly and tragic. Some if not all of
    those Fireman still there are on a suicide mission. The reactor staff must evacuate
    while their still is time as many were killed in Chenoybyl when they refused to
    admit the rods(uranium/plutonium) were superheated and nothing could cool them!!!

    I've stock up on Iodine and so has the US Govt. Trust and the Japanese Govt
    are two mutually exclusive words IMO. If I had my family in Toyko then its
    the next flight out to Denver mate. Denver will probably get some fallout
    too since its in the mountains. There also appears to be a food ban in Japan
    put together as I speak.

    It has all the feeling of what happened at Chernobyl...
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cjF1gkU3NEM
    Think of 5 rectors. Diesel generators totalled. Water cooling plumbing rooted. Core gone molten.
    RUN.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oHzce...eature=related
    She is so calm like she just walked out of the hairdressers. This was real footage and shows
    how some governments react to real bad news- like it was not there period.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DvfDR...eature=related
    Stay with CNNNNNNN....
    Last edited by ELSpeedo; 26-03-2011 at 06:49 PM.

  6. #81
    Lion Eyes. Redwight's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Tolga, QLD.
    Age
    49
    Ride
    BA Falcon ute, AU XR
    Posts
    5,814

    Default Re: More nuclear weapons.

    Yes but the higher dosage death caused by Chernobyl were mostly heart attacks, and no amount of Iodide is going to save you from that amount. That is the territory of it's sooner or later but something is going to give, it's not a matter of if in heavy dosage situations.

  7. #82
    Lion Eyes. Redwight's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Tolga, QLD.
    Age
    49
    Ride
    BA Falcon ute, AU XR
    Posts
    5,814

    Default Re: More nuclear weapons.


  8. #83
    Lion Eyes. Redwight's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Tolga, QLD.
    Age
    49
    Ride
    BA Falcon ute, AU XR
    Posts
    5,814

    Default Re: More nuclear weapons.

    And for those who wish to a little more reading to learn.
    https://secure.wikimedia.org/wikiped...iki/Iodine-131

    The iodine has a half life of 8 days and isn't known to be a killer.

    https://secure.wikimedia.org/wikiped...ki/Caesium-137

    Caesium however is a problem, but from the reading I have done so far it still needs to be in a very long exposure at current level ( about 22 years). It is very unpredictable as which isotope it breaks down into and the half lives are very different as well. One by-product would decay within hours and the other thousands of years. This is the bit that nobody in the area wants getting out of hand.

    The four reactors involved have to handled with a lot of care, as damaged fuel rods are very difficult to extract; and the damage to them was caused by the boron they were using to keep a lid on it at one stage. I don't envy the company involved as they have a long road ahead of them, but if it is done right the situation is manageable. As for the reporting that is going on some of it is nearly approaching the long disproved China Syndrome speculation of the sixties.

    https://secure.wikimedia.org/wikiped...China_Syndrome

  9. #84
    Banned ELSpeedo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    racing death
    Ride
    Deaths Chariot
    Posts
    9,352

    Default Re: More nuclear weapons.

    Quote Originally Posted by Redwight View Post
    And for those who wish to a little more reading to learn.
    https://secure.wikimedia.org/wikiped...iki/Iodine-131

    The iodine has a half life of 8 days and isn't known to be a killer.

    https://secure.wikimedia.org/wikiped...ki/Caesium-137

    Caesium however is a problem, but from the reading I have done so far it still needs to be in a very long exposure at current level ( about 22 years). It is very unpredictable as which isotope it breaks down into and the half lives are very different as well. One by-product would decay within hours and the other thousands of years. This is the bit that nobody in the area wants getting out of hand.

    The four reactors involved have to handled with a lot of care, as damaged fuel rods are very difficult to extract; and the damage to them was caused by the boron they were using to keep a lid on it at one stage. I don't envy the company involved as they have a long road ahead of them, but if it is done right the situation is manageable. As for the reporting that is going on some of it is nearly approaching the long disproved China Syndrome speculation of the sixties.

    https://secure.wikimedia.org/wikiped...China_Syndrome
    That also does not take into the account the heavy water and 'semi fission' occuring every time its cooled and releasing other isotopes
    and the 'neutrons' that could be made. They are hard to detect and could also have a impact on peoples health in the vacinity....

  10. #85
    Banned ELSpeedo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    racing death
    Ride
    Deaths Chariot
    Posts
    9,352

    Default Re: More nuclear weapons.

    double post grrrrrr.
    Last edited by ELSpeedo; 08-04-2011 at 03:29 PM.

  11. #86
    Lion Eyes. Redwight's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Tolga, QLD.
    Age
    49
    Ride
    BA Falcon ute, AU XR
    Posts
    5,814

    Default Re: More nuclear weapons.

    I'm not kidding myself, this whole saga just an additional bad taste in the mouth. The sooner we find a better way of doing things the better, but in my experience fear and cowardice and those that feed off them aren't worth 'a wooden nickel' as the saying goes.

  12. #87
    Banned ELSpeedo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    racing death
    Ride
    Deaths Chariot
    Posts
    9,352

    Default Re: More nuclear weapons.

    Quote Originally Posted by Redwight View Post
    I'm not kidding myself, this whole saga just an additional bad taste in the mouth. The sooner we find a better way of doing things the better, but in my experience fear and cowardice and those that feed off them aren't worth 'a wooden nickel' as the saying goes.
    another 7.2 aftershock has happened. Media blackout on further damage. Looks like the Gods are angry...

  13. #88
    Banned ELSpeedo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    racing death
    Ride
    Deaths Chariot
    Posts
    9,352

    Default Re: More nuclear weapons.

    could you tell Redright for google to behave themselves otherwise I'll tell Langley to tell those mercantile capitalists to behave...

  14. #89
    Lion Eyes. Redwight's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Tolga, QLD.
    Age
    49
    Ride
    BA Falcon ute, AU XR
    Posts
    5,814

    Default Re: More nuclear weapons.

    The gods aren't angry, it's the movement of the nearby tectonic plate. a good video was just made about that and is floating around in the usual places one get such - japans.tsunami.how.it.happened.2011.ws.pdtv.xvid-ftp.avi ! If there are any gods involved then this was a piece put in place a long time ago to make us all realise we have no way of controlling everything in life.
    And google - the imperialist, capatalist, pigs, they want your information at any price and aren't about to start listening to me. I am laughing at several recent events and the varying media coverage involved, have you been to Al Jazeera's site to see how they see the regional conflicts?

  15. #90
    Banned ELSpeedo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    racing death
    Ride
    Deaths Chariot
    Posts
    9,352

    Default Re: More nuclear weapons.

    Quote Originally Posted by Redwight View Post
    The gods aren't angry, it's the movement of the nearby tectonic plate. a good video was just made about that and is floating around in the usual places one get such - japans.tsunami.how.it.happened.2011.ws.pdtv.xvid-ftp.avi ! If there are any gods involved then this was a piece put in place a long time ago to make us all realise we have no way of controlling everything in life.
    And google - the imperialist, capatalist, pigs, they want your information at any price and aren't about to start listening to me. I am laughing at several recent events and the varying media coverage involved, have you been to Al Jazeera's site to see how they see the regional conflicts?
    You know whats the weakness with Occams razor don't you? It can only measure the scientific principle- nothing else.


    My old men of the earth have told me the 4th world is heading towards sunset. Science and the human weakness have
    now sealed mans fate. The crisis between stockmarkets, the middle east and the korean penninsula are in place.

    I think were in the great unknown. Even Einstein did not deny 'the unknown' nor did my old friend Szilard who made death and the fission atom knew this day would come. Humanity thinks its invincible- that be its downfall.

    I can only advise the extraterrestrials who will read this post after Im dead is that I tried but humanity
    deserves all that it gets.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8-BCHN7eFgE
    and the meek shall inherit the earth....

    http://www-ee.stanford.edu/~hellman/...s/hellman.html

    Quote-
    Freezing nuclear arsenals at their current levels would help, but would not change the inevitability. Nor would cutting the number of nuclear weapons in half from 50,000 to 25,000. Twenty-five thousand nuclear weapons is still 25,000 potential accidents, each far more destructive than Chernobyl.
    Last edited by ELSpeedo; 09-04-2011 at 07:46 PM.

  16. #91
    Banned ELSpeedo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    racing death
    Ride
    Deaths Chariot
    Posts
    9,352

    Default Re: More nuclear weapons.

    keep double posting google and you will ask why Wikileaks was housed in a nuclear bunker- hahahahahahahaaa

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z_QFXGxw6Tk
    Some people have more regrets than others in what they have created in this world our ours but at the time may have seemed perfectly logical.
    Last edited by ELSpeedo; 23-08-2013 at 04:04 PM.

  17. #92
    Lion Eyes. Redwight's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Tolga, QLD.
    Age
    49
    Ride
    BA Falcon ute, AU XR
    Posts
    5,814

    Default Re: More nuclear weapons.

    Quote Originally Posted by ELSpeedo View Post
    That also does not take into the account the heavy water and 'semi fission' occuring every time its cooled and releasing other isotopes
    and the 'neutrons' that could be made. They are hard to detect and could also have a impact on peoples health in the vacinity....
    And on this note ***ishima uses light water reactors, and there are some numbers finally emerging about the leakage. This incident would have been more understood if translation wasn't such a problem; there is a job for the 'skynet' made Japanese comprehensible to all of us non speakers.


    Vittorio Hernandez – AHN News

    Tokyo, Japan (AHN) – The Japanese government confirmed Sunday that traces of radioactive iodine have been detected in Tokyo and the Kanto area.

    The traces were discovered following the conduct by the Science and Technology Ministry of a radiation study on precipitation and dust from the ***ishima Daiichi nuclear power plant 1.

    Aside from Tokyo, the radioactive iodine traces were found in the Saitama, Chiba, Yamanashi, Tochigi and Gunma Prefectures. The highest level of iodine radioactivity was found in Tochigi with about 1,300 megabecquerels per square kilometers. A becquerel is the basic unit of radioactivity under the SI system.

    The iodine radioactivity readings in five other prefectures are as follows:

    Gunma – 230
    Tokyo – 51
    Saitama – 64
    Chiba – 21
    Yamanashi – 175

    all measurements in megabecquerels

    Aside from iodine radioactivity, authorities also detected 62 megabecquerels per sq.km. of cesium radioactivity in Tochigi and 84 in Gunma.

    The ministry said the direct impact on human health of iodine and cesium radioactivity has not yet been clearly determined, separate studies were made on air and tap water in Tokyo and five other prefectures. The separate studies indicated no radiation threat in those areas.

    However, subsequent reports said radioactive iodine was detected in tap water in Tokyo and five other prefectures, but within government safety limits.

    Iodine was likewise found in milk and spinach tested from March 16 to 18. Officials warned that the iodine-affected foods could be harmful to human health if ingested.

    According to international nuclear experts from the International Atomic Energy Agency radioactive iodine has a short life span of about eight days, but there is a short-term risk to human health such as damage to the thyroid.

    Because of the detection of iodine radioactivity, Japanese Chief Cabinet Secretary Yukio Edano said Tokyo would decide by Monday if the government would ban consumption and shipment of food products from the areas within the ***ushima plant.

    Meanwhile, engineers of Tokyo Electric Power were able to attach a power cable to the outside of the ***ushima nuclear plant on Saturday, raising hopes that the company could restart pumping of water into the damaged reactors and cool down the overheated fuel rods before more fires and explosions hit the facility.

    But further cabling needs to be completed before the engineers attempt to restart the power pumps at the plant. Until power is restores, firefighters continued to spray water into the plant.
    Article AHN – All Rights Reserved
    Source , admittedly in need of an update.


    And Chernobyl

    Teacher Background
    On Friday, April 25, 1986, as a result of human error during experiments being performed by the staff at Chernobyl, USSR, the cooling system failed resulting in the melting of fuel and, of greater importance to the public, the graphite moderator ignited and began the release of what has been approximated as 1.9 x 1018 Becquerel’s of activity to the environment. The most hazardous isotopes released in this accident are known to Cs-137, I-131, and Sr-90. These isotopes have half-lives sufficiently long to allow them to migrate into the human body or, in the case of Iodine, have the tendency to accumulate in the thyroid gland.

    The plume from the burning graphite traveled in a northwest direction toward Sweden, Finland and Eastern Europe, exposing the public to levels up to 100 times the normal background radiation. A very serious concern involves the contamination of grain and dairy products from fallout. This may cause permanent internal contamination. Both Sr-90 and I-131 migrate to vital organs in the human body where they are impossible to remove, serving as a source of radiation and cause of cancer or other diseases.
    Source.

    One incident is nowhere near on the scale of the other really.

  18. #93
    Lion Eyes. Redwight's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Tolga, QLD.
    Age
    49
    Ride
    BA Falcon ute, AU XR
    Posts
    5,814

    Default Re: More nuclear weapons.

    TLDR.
    Last edited by Redwight; 11-05-2011 at 07:51 PM.

  19. #94
    Lion Eyes. Redwight's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Tolga, QLD.
    Age
    49
    Ride
    BA Falcon ute, AU XR
    Posts
    5,814

    Default Re: More nuclear weapons.

    They are finally at the stage where they can start assessing the actual damage done, a couple more control rods have melted down. Source
    Don't mistake this for the whole containment vessel in Chernobyl, they use the term elephants foot for that one. I said it earlier but I'll explain better now, the problem with damaged fuel rods is that they need to be safely removed one at a time and reprocessed; and that can only happen after they get the intact rods and some framework supporting them out of the road. It's a long and tedious process to do safely so they are going to be at this for ages yet.

    And from an unlikely source they are making plans to clean up some of the mess on the ground and other surfaces around the plant and district. http://tech.slashdot.org/story/11/05...With-Blue-Goo?

  20. #95
    Lion Eyes. Redwight's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Tolga, QLD.
    Age
    49
    Ride
    BA Falcon ute, AU XR
    Posts
    5,814

    Default Re: More nuclear weapons.

    Some light reading on types of radiation, levels and health effects. http://www.abc.net.au/science/articl...t&topic=energy

  21. #96
    Lion Eyes. Redwight's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Tolga, QLD.
    Age
    49
    Ride
    BA Falcon ute, AU XR
    Posts
    5,814

    Default Re: More nuclear weapons.

    And an interesting opinion piece on the severity of the situation.
    http://english.aljazeera.net/indepth...828302638.html

    Snippet
    "***ushima is the biggest industrial catastrophe in the history of mankind," Arnold Gundersen, a former nuclear industry senior vice president, told Al Jazeera.

    Japan's 9.0 earthquake on March 11 caused a massive tsunami that crippled the cooling systems at the Tokyo Electric Power Company's (TEPCO) nuclear plant in ***ushima, Japan. It also led to hydrogen explosions and reactor meltdowns that forced evacuations of those living within a 20km radius of the plant.

    Gundersen, a licensed reactor operator with 39 years of nuclear power engineering experience, managing and coordinating projects at 70 nuclear power plants around the US, says the ***ushima nuclear plant likely has more exposed reactor cores than commonly believed.

    "***ushima has three nuclear reactors exposed and four fuel cores exposed," he said, "You probably have the equivalent of 20 nuclear reactor cores because of the fuel cores, and they are all in desperate need of being cooled, and there is no means to cool them effectively."

    TEPCO has been spraying water on several of the reactors and fuel cores, but this has led to even greater problems, such as radiation being emitted into the air in steam and evaporated sea water - as well as generating hundreds of thousands of tons of highly radioactive sea water that has to be disposed of.
    Read the whole article for the rest.

  22. #97
    Lion Eyes. Redwight's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Tolga, QLD.
    Age
    49
    Ride
    BA Falcon ute, AU XR
    Posts
    5,814

    Default Re: More nuclear weapons.

    They now are starting to have a time frame of work required although it is still subject to change. http://news.ninemsn.com.au/article.aspx?id=8271094

  23. #98
    Lion Eyes. Redwight's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Tolga, QLD.
    Age
    49
    Ride
    BA Falcon ute, AU XR
    Posts
    5,814

    Default Re: More nuclear weapons.

    And now for some really disturbing news on this front, the radiation isn't just at high levels but in places that thought they couldn't be affected.

    Source

    Features
    ***ushima radiation alarms doctors
    Japanese doctors warn of public health problems caused by ***ushima radiation.
    Dahr Jamail Last Modified: 18 Aug 2011 14:09
    Email Article
    Email
    Print Article
    Print
    Share article
    Share
    Send Feedback
    Feedback
    Residents of Ohkuma-cho attend a memorial service for the victims of the March 11 earthquake and tsunami on 24 July 2011 in Ohkuma-cho, ***ushima Prefecture, Japan, 20 km from the ***ushima Daiichi nuclear power plant [EPA]

    Scientists and doctors are calling for a new national policy in Japan that mandates the testing of food, soil, water, and the air for radioactivity still being emitted from ***ushima's heavily damaged Daiichi nuclear power plant.

    "How much radioactive materials have been released from the plant?" asked Dr Tatsuhiko Kodama, a professor at the Research Centre for Advanced Science and Technology and Director of the University of Tokyo's Radioisotope Centre, in a July 27 speech to the Committee of Health, Labour and Welfare at Japan's House of Representatives.

    "The government and TEPCO have not reported the total amount of the released radioactivity yet," said Kodama, who believes things are far worse than even the recent detection of extremely high radiation levels at the plant.

    There is widespread concern in Japan about a general lack of government monitoring for radiation, which has caused people to begin their own independent monitoring, which are also finding disturbingly high levels of radiation.

    Kodama's centre, using 27 facilities to measure radiation across the country, has been closely monitoring the situation at ***ushima - and their findings are alarming.

    According to Dr Kodama, the total amount of radiation released over a period of more than five months from the ongoing ***ushima nuclear disaster is the equivalent to more than 29 "Hiroshima-type atomic bombs" and the amount of uranium released "is equivalent to 20" Hiroshima bombs.

    Kodama, along with other scientists, is concerned about the ongoing crisis resulting from the ***ushima situation, as well as what he believes to be inadequate government reaction, and believes the government needs to begin a large-scale response in order to begin decontaminating affected areas.

    Distrust of the Japanese government's response to the nuclear disaster is now common among people living in the effected prefectures, and people are concerned about their health.

    Recent readings taken at the plant are alarming.

    When on August 2nd readings of 10,000 millisieverts (10 sieverts) of radioactivity per hour were detected at the plant, Japan's science ministry said that level of dose is fatal to humans, and is enough radiation to kill a person within one to two weeks after the exposure.

    10,000 millisieverts (mSv) is the equivalent of approximately 100,000 chest x-rays.

    It is an amount 250 per cent higher than levels recorded at the plant in March after it was heavily damaged by the earthquake and ensuing tsunami.

    The operator of Japan's crippled ***ushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO), that took the reading, used equipment to measure radiation from a distance, and was unable to ascertain the exact level because the device's maximum reading is only 10,000 mSv.

    TEPCO also detected 1,000 millisieverts (mSv) per hour in debris outside the plant, as well as finding 4,000 mSv per hour inside one of the reactor buildings.

    The ***ushima disaster has been rated as a "level seven" on the International Nuclear and Radiological Event Scale (INES). This level, the highest, is the same as the Chernobyl nuclear disaster in 1986, and is defined by the scale as: "[A] major release of radioactive material with widespread health and environmental effects requiring implementation of planned and extended countermeasures."

    The ***ushima and Chernobyl disasters are the only nuclear accidents to have been rated level seven on the scale, which is intended to be logarithmic, similar to the scale used to describe the comparative magnitude of earthquakes. Each increasing level represents an accident approximately ten times more severe than the previous level.

    Doctors in Japan are already treating patients suffering health effects they attribute to radiation from the ongoing nuclear disaster.

    "We have begun to see increased nosebleeds, stubborn cases of diarrhoea, and flu-like symptoms in children," Dr Yuko Yanagisawa, a physician at Funabashi Futawa Hospital in Chiba Prefecture, told Al Jazeera.

    She attributes the symptoms to radiation exposure, and added: "We are encountering new situations we cannot explain with the body of knowledge we have relied upon up until now."

    "The situation at the Daiichi Nuclear facility in ***ushima has not yet been fully stabilised, and we can't yet see an end in sight," Yanagisawa said. "Because the nuclear material has not yet been encapsulated, radiation continues to stream into the environment."

    Health concerns

    Al Jazeera's Aela Callan, reporting from Japan's Ibaraki prefecture, said of the recently detected high radiation readings: "It is now looking more likely that this area has been this radioactive since the earthquake and tsunami, but no one realised until now."

    Workers at ***ushima are only allowed to be exposed to 250 mSv of ionising radiation per year.

    Junichi Matsumoto, a TEPCO spokesman, said the high dose was discovered in an area that does not hamper recovery efforts at the stricken plant.

    Yet radioactive cesium exceeding the government limit was detected in processed tea made in Tochigi City, about 160km from the troubled ***ushima Daiichi nuclear plant, according to the Tochigi Prefectural Government, who said radioactive cesium was detected in tea processed from leaves harvested in the city in early July.

    The level is more than 3 times the provisional government limit.

    Yanagisawa's hospital is located approximately 200km from ***ushima, so the health problems she is seeing that she attributes to radiation exposure causes her to be concerned by what she believes to be a grossly inadequate response from the government.

    From her perspective, the only thing the government has done is to, on April 25, raise the acceptable radiation exposure limit for children from 1 mSv/year to 20 mSv/year.

    "This has caused controversy, from the medical point of view," Yanagisawa told Al Jazeera. "This is certainly an issue that involves both personal internal exposures as well as low-dose exposures."

    Junichi Sato, Greenpeace Japan Executive Director, said: "It is utterly outrageous to raise the exposure levels for children to twenty times the maximum limit for adults."

    "The Japanese government cannot simply increase safety limits for the sake of political convenience or to give the impression of normality."

    Authoritative current estimates of the health effects of low-dose ionizing radiation are published in the Biological Effects of Ionising Radiation VII (BEIR VII) report from the US National Academy of Sciences.

    The report reflects the substantial weight of scientific evidence proving there is no exposure to ionizing radiation that is risk-free.

    The BEIR VII estimates that each 1 mSv of radiation is associated with an increased risk of all forms of cancer other than leukemia of about 1-in-10,000; an increased risk of leukemia of about 1-in-100,000; and a 1-in-17,500 increased risk of cancer death.

    Dr Helen Caldicott, the founding president of Physicians for Social Responsibility, a group that was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1985, is equally concerned about the health effects from Japan's nuclear disaster.

    "Radioactive elements get into the testicles and ovaries, and these cause genetic disease like diabetes, cystic fibrosis, and mental retardation," she told Al Jazeera. "There are 2,600 of these diseases that get into our genes and are passed from generation to generation, forever."

    So far, the only cases of acute radiation exposure have involved TEPCO workers at the stricken plant. Lower doses of radiation, particularly for children, are what many in the medical community are most concerned about, according to Dr Yanagisawa.

    "Humans are not yet capable of accurately measuring the low dose exposure or internal exposure," she explained, "Arguing 'it is safe because it is not yet scientifically proven [to be unsafe]' would be wrong. That fact is that we are not yet collecting enough information to prove the situations scientifically. If that is the case, we can never say it is safe just by increasing the annual 1mSv level twenty fold."

    Her concern is that the new exposure standards by the Japanese government do not take into account differences between adults and children, since children's sensitivity to radiation exposure is several times higher than that of adults.

    Al Jazeera contacted Prime Minister Naoto Kan's office for comment on the situation.

    Speaking on behalf of the Deputy Cabinet Secretary for Public Relations for the Prime Minister's office, Noriyuki Shikata said that the Japanese government "refers to the ICRP [International Commission on Radiological Protection] recommendation in 2007, which says the reference levels of radiological protection in emergency exposure situations is 20-100 mSv per year. The Government of Japan has set planned evacuation zones and specific spots recommended for evacuation where the radiation levels reach 20 mSv/year, in order to avoid excessive radiation exposure."

    The prime minister's office explained that approximately 23bn yen ($300mn) is planned for decontamination efforts, and the government plans to have a decontamination policy "by around the end of August", with a secondary budget of about 97bn yen ($1.26bn) for health management and monitoring operations in the affected areas.

    When questioned about the issue of "acute radiation exposure", Shikata pointed to the Japanese government having received a report from TEPCO about six of their workers having been exposed to more than 250 mSv, but did not mention any reports of civilian exposures.

    Prime Minister Kan's office told Al Jazeera that, for their ongoing response to the ***ushima crisis, "the government of Japan has conducted all the possible countermeasures such as introduction of automatic dose management by ID codes for all workers and 24 hour allocation of doctors. The government of Japan will continue to tackle the issue of further improving the health management including medium and long term measures".

    Shikata did not comment about Kodama's findings.

    Kodama, who is also a doctor of internal medicine, has been working on decontamination of radioactive materials at radiation facilities in hospitals of the University of Tokyo for the past several decades.

    "We had rain in Tokyo on March 21 and radiation increased to .2 micosieverts/hour and, since then, the level has been continuously high," said Kodama, who added that his reporting of radiation findings to the government has not been met an adequate reaction. "At that time, the chief cabinet secretary, Mr Edano, told the Japanese people that there would be no immediate harm to their health."

    Kodama is an expert in internal exposure to radiation, and is concerned that the government has not implemented a strong response geared towards measuring radioactivity in food.

    "Although three months have passed since the accident already, why have even such simple things have not been done yet?" he said. "I get very angry and fly into a rage."

    According to Kodama, the major problem caused by internal radiation exposure is the generation of cancer cells as the radiation causes unnatural cellular mutation.

    "Radiation has a high risk to embryos in pregnant women, juveniles, and highly proliferative cells of people of growing ages. Even for adults, highly proliferative cells, such as hairs, blood, and intestinal epithelium cells, are sensitive to radiation."

    'Children are at greater risk'

    Early on in the disaster, Dr Makoto Kondo of the department of radiology of Keio University's School of Medicine warned of "a large difference in radiation effects on adults compared to children".

    Kondo explained the chances of children developing cancer from radiation exposure was many times higher than adults.

    "Children's bodies are underdeveloped and easily affected by radiation, which could cause cancer or slow body development. It can also affect their brain development," he said.

    Yanagisawa assumes that the Japanese government's evacuation standards, as well as their raising the permissible exposure limit to 20mSv "can cause hazards to children's health," and therefore "children are at a greater risk".

    Nishio Masamichi, director of Japan's Hakkaido Cancer Centre and a radiation treatment specialist, published an article on July 27 titled: "The Problem of Radiation Exposure Countermeasures for the ***ushima Nuclear Accident: Concerns for the Present Situation".

    In the report, Masamichi said that such a dramatic increase in permitted radiation exposure was akin to "taking the lives of the people lightly". He believes that 20mSv is too high, especially for children who are far more susceptible to radiation.

    "No level of radiation is acceptable, for children or anyone else," Caldicott told Al Jazeera. "Children are ten to 20 times more sensitive than adults. They must not be exposed to radiation of any level. At all."

    In early July, officials with the Japanese Nuclear Safety Commission announced that approximately 45 per cent of children in the ***ushima region had experienced thyroid exposure to radiation, according to a survey carried out in late March. The commission has not carried out any surveys since then.

    "Now the Japanese government is underestimating the effects of low dosage and/or internal exposures and not raising the evacuation level even to the same level adopted in Chernobyl," Yanagisawa said. "People's lives are at stake, especially the lives of children, and it is obvious that the government is not placing top priority on the people's lives in their measures."

    Caldicott feels the lack of a stronger response to safeguard the health of people in areas where radiation is found is "reprehensible".

    "Millions of people need to be evacuated from those high radiation zones, especially the children."

    Dr Yanagisawa is concerned about what she calls "late onset disorders" from radiation exposure resulting from the ***ushima disaster, as well as increasing cases of infertility and miscarriages.

    "Incidence of cancer will undoubtedly increase," she said. "In the case of children, thyroid cancer and leukemia can start to appear after several years. In the case of adults, the incidence of various types of cancer will increase over the course of several decades."

    Yanagisawa said it is "without doubt" that cancer rates among the ***ushima nuclear workers will increase, as will cases of lethargy, atherosclerosis, and other chronic diseases among the general population in the effected areas.

    Yanagisawa believes it is time to listen to survivors of the atomic bombings. "To be exposed to radiation, to be told there is no immediate effect, and afterwards to be stricken with cancer - what it is like to suffer this way over a long period of time, only the survivors of the atomic bombings can truly understand," she told Al Jazeera.

    Radioactive food and water

    An August 1 press release from Japan's MHLW said no radioactive materials have been detected in the tap water of ***ushima prefecture, according to a survey conducted by the Japanese government's Nuclear Emergency Response Headquarters.

    The government defines no detection as "no results exceeding the 'Index values for infants (radioactive iodine)'," and says "in case the level of radioactive iodine in tap water exceeds 100 Bq/kg, to refrain from giving infants formula milk dissolved by tap water, having them intake tap water "

    Yet, on June 27, results were published from a study that found 15 residents of ***ushima prefecture had tested positive for radiation in their urine.

    Dr Nanao Kamada, professor emeritus of radiation biology at Hiroshima University, has been to ***ushima prefecture twice in order to take internal radiation exposure readings and facilitated the study.

    "The risk of internal radiation is more dangerous than external radiation," Dr Kamada told Al Jazeera. "And internal radiation exposure does exist for ***ushima residents."

    According to the MHLW, distribution of several food products in ***ushima Prefecture remain restricted. This includes raw milk, vegetables including spinach, kakina, and all other leafy vegetables, including cabbage, shiitake mushrooms, bamboo shoots, and beef.

    The distribution of tealeaves remains restricted in several prefectures, including all of Ibaraki, and parts of Tochigi, Gunma, Chiba, Kanagawa Prefectures.

    Iwate prefecture suspended all beef exports because of caesium contamination on August 1, making it the fourth prefecture to do so.
    Due to caesium contaminated straw, beef exports have been banned in four Japanese prefectures [EPA]

    Jyunichi Tokuyama, an expert with the Iwate Prefecture Agricultural and Fisheries Department, told Al Jazeera he did not know how to deal with the crisis. He was surprised because he did not expect radioactive hot spots in his prefecture, 300km from the ***ushima nuclear plant.

    "The biggest cause of this contamination is the rice straw being fed to the cows, which was highly radioactive," Tokuyama told Al Jazeera.

    Kamada feels the Japanese government is acting too slowly in response to the ***ushima disaster, and that the government needs to check radiation exposure levels "in each town and village" in ***ushima prefecture.

    "They have to make a general map of radiation doses," he said. "Then they have to be concerned about human health levels, and radiation exposures to humans. They have to make the exposure dose map of ***ushima prefecture. ***ushima is not enough. Probably there are hot spots outside of ***ushima. So they also need to check ground exposure levels."

    Caldicott said people around the world should be concerned about the ongoing nuclear crisis at the ***ushima Daiichi plant. Radiation that continues to be released has global consequences.

    More than 11,000 tonnes of radioactive water has been released into the ocean from the stricken plant.
    Scientists warn that tuna caught off the Pacific coastal prefecture in northern Japan are now at risk of being radioactive [EPA]

    "Those radioactive elements bio-concentrate in the algae, then the crustaceans eat that, which are eaten by small then big fish," Caldicott said. "That's why big fish have high concentrations of radioactivity and humans are at the top of the food chain, so we get the most radiation, ultimately."

    On August 6, the 66th anniversary of the US nuclear bombing of Hiroshima, Japanese Prime Minister Naoto Kan said: "Regarding nuclear energy, we will deeply reflect over the myth that nuclear energy is safe. We will thoroughly look into the cause of the [***ushima] accident, and to secure safety, we'll implement fundamental measures while also decreasing the degree of dependence on nuclear power generation, to aim for a society that does not rely on nuclear power."

    But doctors, scientists, agricultural experts, and much of the general public in Japan feel that a much more aggressive response to the nuclear disaster is needed.

    Kodama believes the government needs to begin a large-scale response in order to begin decontaminating affected areas. He cited Japan's itai itai disease, when cadmium poisoning from mining resulted in the government eventually having to spend 800 billion yen to decontaminate an area of 1,500 hectares.

    "How much cost will be needed if the area is 1,000 times larger?"

    Follow Dahr Jamail on Twitter: @DahrJamail

  24. #99
    Lion Eyes. Redwight's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Tolga, QLD.
    Age
    49
    Ride
    BA Falcon ute, AU XR
    Posts
    5,814

    Default Re: More nuclear weapons.

    It seems that they finally have temperatures under control in all three reactors.
    Source,
    Japan declares ***ushima stable
    Key milestone reached in efforts to bring under control reactors at tsunami-stricken nuclear plant.
    Last Modified: 16 Dec 2011 14:28
    inShare5
    Email Article
    Email
    Print Article
    Print
    Share article
    Share
    Send Feedback
    Feedback
    Experts warn that it will take decades to fully dismantle ***ushima's six reactors [AFP]

    Japan has declared that its tsunami-stricken ***ushima nuclear power plant has reached cold shutdown condition, passing a key milestone in efforts to bring under control the world's worst nuclear accident since Chernobyl 25 years ago.

    "The reactors have reached a state of cold shutdown condition," Yoshihiko Noda, Japan's prime minister, said at the government's nuclear emergency response meeting on Friday.

    "Even if unforeseeable incidents happen, the situation is such that radiation levels on the boundary of the plant can now be maintained at a low level," he said.
    Click here for more of Al Jazeera's special coverage

    "The government is due to set a clear road map and will do the utmost to decommission the plant," the Japanese PM said.

    The ***ushima Daiichi plant, 240km northeast of Tokyo, was damaged on March 11 by a devastating earthquake and a 10-metre-high tsunami, which damaged its cooling systems, triggering meltdowns and radiation leaks.

    Declaring a cold shutdown condition will have repercussions well beyond the plant: it is a government pre-condition before it allows about 80,000 residents evacuated from within a 20km radius of the plant to return home.

    A cold shutdown condition is when water used to cool nuclear fuel rods remains below its boiling point, preventing the fuel from reheating. One of the chief aims of the plant's operator, Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO), had been to bring the reactors to this stage by the year-end.

    After months of efforts, the water temperature in all three of the affected reactors fell below boiling point by September, but TEPCO has been cautious of declaring a cold shutdown, saying it had to see if temperatures and the amount of radiation emitted from the plant remained stable.

    In an interview with Al Jazeera, Imad Khadduri, a nuclear scientist, said: "The Japanese PM’s plans are very formidable and very ambitious and detailed. And one measure of the success of this plan of decontamination can be juxtaposed against the efforts since March when the accident happened.

    "I am very hopeful that the decontamination will be done in a very meticulous and rigorous manner unlike that of the Chernobyl in Russia nearly 25 years ago," he said.

    Massive cleanup

    Khadduri said: "The nuclear power plants, in fact, are large stainless steel eggs under huge pressure, almost 72 times the atmospheric pressure. And by cold shutdown, they mean that the pressure inside the plant has been brought down to the atmospheric level.

    "In the past more than eight months, they have managed to reduce the temperature of fuel elements to under 95 degrees celsius, which is equal to the atmospheric pressure.

    "Decommission means: They can remove the top part of the stainless steel egg and take out nuclear fuel elements, store them safely and starting to dissemble the plant and tube them with concrete materials."

    He further added: "These [highly radioactive nuclear fuels] are stored at radio-established spent fuel storage tanks. These can be stored at nearly 54 other nuclear power stations that have large capacity for spent fuel storage."
    Report says ***ushima disaster is responsible for the world's worst nuclear sea contamination [Al Jazeera]

    TEPCO said early in the crisis that it did not plan to entomb the damaged Daiichi reactors in concrete, the option chosen at Ukraine's Chernobyl where reactors caught fire and burned for days. Instead, it favoured the gradual removal of the nuclear fuel for storage elsewhere.

    The government and TEPCO will aim to begin removing the undamaged nuclear rods from Daiichi's spent fuel pools as early as next year. However, retrieval of fuel that melted down in their reactors may not begin for another decade, with the complete dismantling of the plant expected to take up to 40 years, domestic media reported on Thursday.

    The enormous cost of the cleanup and compensating the victims of the disaster has drained TEPCO financially. The government may inject about $13bn into the company as early as next summer in a de facto nationalisation, sources told the Reuters news agency last week.

    Japan also faces a massive cleanup task outside the plant if residents are to be allowed to return home. The environment ministry says about 2,400sq km of land around the plant may need to be decontaminated.

    The crisis shook the public's faith in nuclear energy and Japan is now reviewing its earlier plan to raise the proportion of electricity generated from nuclear power to 50 per cent by 2030 from 30 per cent in 2010.

    Living in fear of radiation is part of life for residents both near and far from the plant. Cases of excessive radiation in vegetables, tea, milk, seafood and water have stoked anxiety despite assurances from public officials that the levels detected are not dangerous.

    Chernobyl's experience shows that anxiety is likely to persist for years to come, with residents living near the former Soviet plant still regularly checking local produce for radiation before consuming them 25 years after the disaster.

    The announcement may not dramatically improve Noda's support ratings, eroded by his steadfast commitment to a sales tax increase to cope with a public debt burden twice the size of Japan's economy.

    Noda is also faced with a formidable list of other tasks, such as helping a stagnant economy deal with the yen's rise to historic highs.
    Last edited by ELSpeedo; 23-08-2013 at 04:01 PM.

  25. #100
    Banned ELSpeedo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    racing death
    Ride
    Deaths Chariot
    Posts
    9,352

    Default Re: The Fission legacy

    Why the US and Russia should not be caught in Middle East politics. This is quite
    reminiscent of '73....

    http://nationalinterest.org/commenta...iet-union-8945
    Quote-
    The Syrian regime has now almost certainly attacked its own people with chemical weapons. Tens upon tens of thousands have died over the two years of the Syrian civil war, easily making it one of the largest conflicts in the region since World War II. And yet, although Syria is a close friend, if not ally, of Russia, there has been no major military crisis between the former Cold War rivals, no impending clash of the great powers over Damascus; instead, the United Nations is ensnared, as usual, in its own bureaucratic bumf.

    Calls for intervention against Syria, particularly in the United States, are met with grim warnings about the difficulties and complications of intervening against a third-string Middle Eastern power. Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Martin Dempsey, for example, reportedly confronted Secretary of State John Kerry over striking Syrian air bases. Dempsey told Kerry such an effort would require some seven hundred sorties, and then, according to a report last June, “threw a series of brushback pitches at Kerry, demanding to know just exactly what the post-strike plan would be and pointing out that the State Department didn’t fully grasp the complexity of such an operation.”

    One reason these missions might be too difficult is that the United States is still spending too much time, money and intellectual energy preparing to fight a far more important conflict with a far deadlier enemy: global nuclear war with the Soviet Union. We may not be able to suppress the air defenses of a weakened dictatorship in the middle of a massive civil war, but we’re certainly more than prepared to take on the old USSR.

    Well, maybe it’s not a plan to fight the Soviet Union, exactly, but the U.S. defense budget and the overall approach to the defense of the United States from foreign nuclear attack still seems rooted somewhere in the 1980s, a relic from the time of Rubik’s Cubes, Rick Springfield, and Ronald Wilson Reagan.

    Last winter, Deputy Secretary of Defense Ashton Carter made clear that the two U.S. defense efforts to be insulated as much as possible from sequestration would be Afghanistan and nuclear deterrence. Certainly, the protection of our men and women in the field was a natural and unarguable priority. But nuclear weapons? In Aspen last month, Carter put it this way: “I can't short the people who are at war in Afghanistan. I can't short nuclear deterrence. Submarines have to sail. You can't—we can't be unready as a nuclear force. You know, the presidential airplane needs to keep flying and so forth.”

    If the question is phrased in such a binary way—ready or not ready for a nuclear attack—then this logic is ironclad. No one, including me, is arguing for the immediate and complete disarmament of the United States, or for allowing budget cuts to strip the President of the ability to launch nuclear arms. What makes far less sense, however, is the small army of zombie policies that should have died two decades ago but keep lumbering forward against all strategic and budgetary prudence. Take missile defense. Last week, George Lewis noted that the Missile Defense Agency seems to have returned to pursuing boost-phase missile defenses after killing two similar programs in 2009 and 2011. Leave aside the technological issue for a moment, and ask: what purpose would such defenses serve?

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Single_...erational_Plan
    They say you have to plan for everything. 4 minutes to midnight.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=knSSUEdLcvg
    Another plausible explination of how WWIII can easily start.
    Last edited by ELSpeedo; 05-09-2013 at 05:44 PM.

+ Reply to Thread
Page 4 of 5 FirstFirst ... 2 3 4 5 LastLast

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

     

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts